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Ewalia magic tips

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Op deze pagina wil EWALIA u graag informatie geven over de gezondheid van paarden, preventie en kruidenwerking. Waar er wetenschappelijke studies bestaan, wordt erop gelet dat deze als basis voor teksten en publicaties worden gebruikt.

Op deze pagina wil EWALIA u graag informatie geven over de gezondheid van paarden, preventie en kruidenwerking. Waar er wetenschappelijke studies bestaan, wordt erop gelet dat deze als basis... meer lezen »
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Ewalia magic tips

magictipps_ewalia

Op deze pagina wil EWALIA u graag informatie geven over de gezondheid van paarden, preventie en kruidenwerking. Waar er wetenschappelijke studies bestaan, wordt erop gelet dat deze als basis voor teksten en publicaties worden gebruikt.

The stimulating and invigorating effects of the aromatic rosemary plant (Salvia rosmarinus, Rosmarinus officinalis) have long been used in veterinary medicine. This well-known Mediterranean herb's valuable substances promote blood circulation and are effective in helping weak cardiovascular systems as well as musculoskeletal systems.
Deworming your horse can be a tricky issue. How often? Which method? The conventional method of regularly treating the entire herd with a broad-spectrum wormer has made some worm species resistant to these chemical weapons. More success can be seen in targeted, selective deworming which reduces the use of chemicals. But are there effective alternatives? Discover here how your horse can better overcome the burden of stomach and intestinal parasites.
Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) has a soothing effect on nervous symptoms in horses and dogs. The lemon-scented medicinal herb has soothing effects on the nerves as well as on gastrointestinal ailments.
Plantago lanceolata, aka lamb's tongue or ribwort plantain, is found almost everywhere: along paths, in meadows, and on lawns as "weeds". This modest plant deserves more attention, because it is one of the best remedies for respiratory diseases in horses and dogs.
The basis for any proper equine diet is roughage. However, not all types of roughage are equally suitable for horses. Apart from fluctuations in quality, there are big differences in terms of tolerability. Find out what you should know about the different forms of roughage here.
Great yellow gentian (Gentiana lutea) – or, more specifically, its root – is by far the most bitter of all medicinal plants grown in these parts: one gramme is enough to make 10 L of water taste bitter. Gentian helps to relieve digestive complaints and is also an excellent aid in strengthening the entire organism.
Ginkgo products/uses are among the best-known herbal remedies for chronic age-related ailments. The ginkgo tree's fan-shaped leaves contain active ingredients that can promote blood circulation, protect the nerve cells, and alleviate signs of ageing in horses and dogs.
In its native regions of the Far East, ginseng (Panax ginseng) is said to have life-extending and rejuvenating properties. Indeed, ginseng root contains substances that stimulate metabolism and the immune system and help to relieve stress and exhaustion. Ginseng is a valuable aid against fatigue and weakness and helps to increase well-being, especially in older dogs.
Peppermint (Mentha x piperita) is one of the most popular medicinal herbs used in herbal medicine. This plant, with its fresh, peppery taste, contains substances that calm gastrointestinal complaints, relax cramps, and stimulate the appetite.
The captivating scent of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) conjures memories of warm summer evenings in the south, as well as of grandmother's linen cupboard... Lavender is one of the most well-known and most popular aromatic plants, but it's also an effective healing herb for treating restlessness, nervousness and stress reactions.
The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus subsp. scolymus (L.) HEGI) is a delicacy. Its flower buds and bracts are prized as a fine vegetable. The artichoke's bitter rosette leaves are considered inedible, but they contain valuable substances which relieve digestive complaints and promote liver metabolism.
Speedwell (Veronica officinalis) was once a popular healing herb that has since fallen out of fashion. That's unfortunate, because when combined with other herbs, this medicinal plant can really provide gentle help for sensitive stomachs and skin ailments.
24/7 turnout means that the horse spends all day and night at pasture and lives primarily on forage, the way his ancestors did in ancient times. But is round-the-clock turnout really good for our horses? Read here about where problems arise and what you should know before you decide to give your horse 24/7 turnout.
The unique active substances in Hypericum perforatum, aka perforate St John's wort, make this a true feel-good plant. It can lift moods, calm anxious horses and dogs, and contribute to their general well-being.
In olden days, well-trodden pastures where geese would graze often sported pretty, yellow flowers. Silverweed (Potentilla anserina L.), also called silver cinquefoil, prefers well-fertilised, compacted soils – and, true to its Latin name, is indeed a favourite food of geese. In veterinary medicine, the plant is considered an excellent remedy for diarrhoea.
You've decided to move your horse to a new yard. Or maybe you've just bought a horse which will now be relocating to his new home. You're excited and looking forward to it, but keep in mind that moving causes stress in your horse. Read on to learn why horses have problems moving to new homes and how you can make the move easier for your horse.
The slender birch with its pale bark is commonly noted for its many benefits. Indeed, birch leaves and birch bark have vitalising effects on both the human and equine organisms. Birch leaves have mild diuretic effects, helping to flush out the kidneys and bladder and making them ideal for spring detoxes.
Besity and lack of exercise are often the causes for serious metabolic disorders. Topping the list is EMS, or Equine Metabolic Syndrome – a disruption of the horse's carbohydrate metabolism which can have serious consequences, including dreaded laminitis.
The name fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) comes from the old French fenugrec, in turn from the Latin faenum Graecum, literally meaning "Greek hay". The seeds' valuable substances include mucilage which helps to reduce irritations to the stomach lining and alleviate stomach ailments.
As soon as the first green shoots appear in the fields, horses can't wait to get at them. Even with all that joy, however, we should not forget that spring turnout can also have its drawbacks: transitioning to pasture grass too quickly can bring the risk of diarrhoea, colic, or worst case, laminitis. Learn here why this transition should be carried out slowly and how you can start the grazing season right.
Equine Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy (PSSM, EPSSM) is a progressive disease of the skeletal muscles with very painful symptoms in acute cases. There are differences between Type 1 PSSM and Type 2 PSSM.
Sage (Salvia officinalis) was viewed as a universal medicinal herb in earlier times. For horses, and dogs, the active ingredients of this native Mediterranean plant bring relief from ailments of the throat and pharynx.
Willow bark is one of the oldest medicines on earth. For horses, it is a natural alternative to painkillers and anti-rheumatic drugs. Horses tolerate willow bark quite well and it can be used to support the musculoskeletal system in horses with painful diseases.
In addition to giving a fine flavour to Christmas biscuits, aniseed is known to provide quick relief from digestive and respiratory ailments in horses and dogs. Aniseed's healing properties are mainly found in the seeds' essential oils.
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